Intelligence Reports

Progress Report – New 15mm Hadrian’s Wall range Wall Sections

Jul 2nd, 2010 | By | Category: Rome, Workbench

Continuing the series of Friday updates regarding ongoing new model designs, this week I’m looking at the progress on the assorted wall sections for the new Hadrian’s / Roman Frontier Wall range. There is a small dilemma with this set of pieces, that I’d like to present to you before I discuss the detail, and […]



Progress Report – New 15mm scale Hadrian’s Wall Turrets

Jun 25th, 2010 | By | Category: Rome, Workbench

Last week, I previewed the upcoming Porta Secundus Limes / Triarus Civica for the forthcoming Roman Frontier (Hadrian’s Wall) range of 15mm wargames buildings, currently on the design bench.  This week, again with copious research notes, I’m looking at the wall turrets which appeared at 500 metre intervals between the mile-forts along the frontier wall, […]



Progress Report – New 15mm scale Hadrian’s Wall range Gateways

Jun 18th, 2010 | By | Category: Rome, Workbench

Customers and colleagues who’ve followed Long Range Logistics since I relaunched the brand in 2003, will be aware that for a long time I’ve been talking about the new upscaled Hadrian’s Wall set that I’ve been designing. But first a warning – there’s a lot of pictures on this page, it might take a bit […]



WW2 Thames Estuary Coastal (Maundsley) Forts

Dec 2nd, 2009 | By | Category: European Coastline, Scratch Building

During WW2, the British government built a series of offshore platforms designed by Guy Maundsley, as Anti Aircraft (AA)  defence platforms.  They were intended to provide static defence support for shipping convoys gathering in the Thames shipping channels before transit to their destinations, as well as to prevent inshore raids by enemy surface craft. Abandoned […]



Road to Crecy 1346 – Bibliography, Conclusions, and Hindsight

Feb 2nd, 2009 | By | Category: AD 1346 Crecy

Medieval wargamers and rules writers have continually over-emphasised the value of the full frontal assault by deep ranks of pike during the Hundred Years War. That tactic belongs to the period before Christ and after Henry VIII. Between those times, the long spear was used for infantry clashes, whilst the pike was used to finish-off opponents, without getting within reach of their dying sword swing.



Road to Crecy 1346 – Battle of Blanquetaque Ford

Jan 26th, 2009 | By | Category: AD 1346 Crecy

The feudal Frenchmen, having never encountered the longbow before, were staggered by the vast numbers of casualties caused by an enemy who was still so far away as to be out of crossbow range. They stood and watched clouds of arrows rising into the sky and then plunging into their ranks hitting them in the thighs and shoulders at steep angles. The peasantry and militia turned and ran leaving the wounded to the mercy of the pikemen, and the nobility to face the blades of their English counterparts.



Road to Crecy 1346 – Battle of Oisemont

Jan 19th, 2009 | By | Category: AD 1346 Crecy

The key statement in contemporary descriptions of the battle is that the French “advanced” on the English. This would imply that potentially they did not give the English army any time to deploy into line. Factoring this into your game plan could make for an interesting scenario – reversing the normal situation of French columns advancing into an arc of fire from a steady English line.



Road to Crecy 1346 – Battle of Abbeville

Jan 12th, 2009 | By | Category: AD 1346 Crecy

That the English were trounced at Abbeville and chased from the field, therefore indicates they used the longbow from horseback and lost all advantage from the weapon. It could also be that the town had artillery in use, that was not recorded in chronicles. The combined effects, of poor weapon deployment on horses being made skittery by artillery, could explain their losing this battle.



Road to Crecy 1346 – The Somme Campaign – Overview

Jan 5th, 2009 | By | Category: AD 1346 Crecy

Having marched through France, even to the gates of Paris, Edward IIIs army met their first real resistance and defeats on the River Somme. A greedy peasant, and traitors in the French camp, allowed him to evade a massive opposing army.



Road to Crecy 1346 – Campaign March to the Somme

Dec 29th, 2008 | By | Category: AD 1346 Crecy

Before long, the raiding army gained a reputation for terror, pillage, rape, murder, and arson, which then preceded their route. It was this reputation that led to the immediate and uncontested surrender of Barfleur and then Cherbourg. Only the pleading of d’Harcourt prevented the complete destruction of Caen.