18mm / 1:100 (& TT-Gauge)

18mm / 1:100 Figures & Models on –
eBay Australia
– eBay Belgium
– eBay Canada
– eBay France
– eBay India
– eBay Italy
– eBay Singapore
– eBay UK
– eBay US

TT-gauge Rail Models on –
eBay Australia
– eBay Belgium
– eBay Canada
– eBay France
– eBay India
– eBay Italy
– eBay Singapore
– eBay UK
– eBay US

18mm is 1:100 scale, 15mm is 1:120 scale.

There is a 20% size increase from 15mm to 18mm.

This means an 18mm figure representing a 6-foot man at 18mm, is representing a 7-foot 3-inch man at 15mm.

This section deals only with the exactly equivalent 18mm and 1:100 scales. I consider these to be completely different to true-scale 15mm / 1:120, and not compatible.

The true-scale 15mm / 1:120 matched scales have their own section.

1:100 / 18mm scale is TT-gauge in the railway modelling hobby. The TT-gauge sizing is often stated as the origin of 18mm as a wargames scale, particularly with companies such as Skytrex producing in both 1:100 and 1:120. Other mainstream wargames figure producers also manufacture for the railway modelling hobby, though it primarily UK firms that do this cross-over between the sectors, and it is almost unheard of for predominantly railway model companies to produce for the wargames hobby.  Strictly speaking, TT-gauge did not give birth to 18mm gaming models, that was caused by lazy manual designers, and then by technology such as sublimation remastering.

Warning – Rant alert!

Unfortunately, as with the larger 25mm figure scale, 15mm has seen size creepage over the years, which has led to 18mm figures being called 15mm by major manufacturers. This began in the early 1980s when Minifigs re-sculpted their Ancient Roman ranges producing miniatures that changed considerably in size. All wargames figure scales were originally stated as being representative of a six-foot tall man from sole of feet to top of head, without footwear or headwear.

During the mid-80s to mid-90s, this somehow became perverted to mean from sole of feet to the eyes. If designers held absolutely true to this, it would have resulted in 16.5-17mm high figures. They did not, and the increasing implementation of sublimation mastering (a computer-aided manufacturing process) meant that increasingly a scale of 1:100 was pre-programmed instead of the more accurate 1:120. Sublimation mastering has completely undermined true-scale 15mm wargaming.

One of the most popular manufacturers at “false-15mm” today is BattleFront with their Flames of War series of WW2 rules, army lists, and models. They are a perfect example of bastardisation of the scale. BattleFront’s buildings and vehicles are 1:100 scale. Their figures, mastered to fit with the vehicles are 18mm tall (plus base) making them also 1:100, and yet they advocate and provide 1:144 aircraft, whilst claiming all of their products are 15mm. The only thing I can say to this is a very annoyed, “W.T.F?”

You may guess I’m not a great fan of size creepage within a scale band. I’m also not a great fan of being lied to concerning the actual properties of items I’m buying by mail order. If I want to build a 1:100 diorama for a scale modelling competition, then I want everything I buy for it to be 1:100, not spread from 1:144 through to 1:100, or even to the 1:93 ratio of 20mm wargames scale.

When a sizeable figures manufacturer labels figures as 15mm, that’s what I expect to receive, not oversized 18mm/1:100 figures, and I don’t care how large a company they are, or how long they have been in the industry – I want correctly labelled products.

LRL 1:100 Tudor to AWI / SYW village forge / smithy

LRL 1:100 Tudor to AWI / SYW village forge / smithy
showing 15mm, 18mm & 25mm figures for scale clarification

Long Range Logistics 18mm Ranges

Long Range Logistics has increasing range-width for 18mm-scale buildings and scenics, these are 1:100 ratio reductions as opposed to the traditional 1:120 / true-15mm scale, which is still the mainstay of our catalogue.

We will also be designing 20mm scale / 1:93 building ranges in the future but do not yet have a start date for this.

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